Home » The Hellfighters of Harlem: African-American Soldiers Who Fought for the Right to Fight for Their Country by Bill Harris
The Hellfighters of Harlem: African-American Soldiers Who Fought for the Right to Fight for Their Country Bill Harris

The Hellfighters of Harlem: African-American Soldiers Who Fought for the Right to Fight for Their Country

Bill Harris

Published
ISBN : 9780786713073
Paperback
256 pages
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 About the Book 

They set a record in World War I with the longest frontline service of any American regiment, without a soldier captured or a foot of ground lost—but the 369th was forbidden to fight for the U.S. army. Handed over to France, this all-black unitMoreThey set a record in World War I with the longest frontline service of any American regiment, without a soldier captured or a foot of ground lost—but the 369th was forbidden to fight for the U.S. army. Handed over to France, this all-black unit became a band of heroes, such as private Henry Johnson, who singlehandedly knocked out a platoon of twenty-eight German troops. The feat won him Frances prestigious Croix de Guerre—yet Johnson is today still denied Americas Medal of Honor. The saga of soldiers who struggled to reach the front lines was shadowed by racism, debates among black leaders over whether African Americans should withhold support for the war until steps toward equality were made, inadequate provisions forcing them to drill in the streets of Harlem and in a local dance hall, and finally being forbidden from serving under U.S. command. Their service and return, complete with a spectacular parade up Fifth Avenue, helped fuel the Harlem Renaissance and paved the way for the 369ths contributions in World War II, in Iraq during the first Gulf War, and other black military heroes who have followed in their footsteps. Eight pages of photographs are featured in this important work.