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The Child and His Religion George Ellsworth Dawson

The Child and His Religion

George Ellsworth Dawson

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230324906
Paperback
126 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...of Louisiana like theirMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...of Louisiana like their brethern of Canada were not long in finding out how much more easily and rapidly a confidence could be acquired by the attractive methods of the fur trade, than by the laboring and plodding pursuit of agriculture. In casting about for new fields of enterprise, the vast fur bearing resources of the region drained by the Missouri and its tributaries did not remain long undiscovered- and freighting expeditions began timidly to ascend the stream and frequent the Indian villages upon its banks. Gathering boldness with each new effort, they pressed higher and higher until ere long it was made evident to the more sagacious merchants that it would soon become the principal highway to the fur trade of Louisiana, which included that all the vast regions drained by the Missouri river and its tributaries. At length in February 1764, the celebrated firm of Leclede, Maxan and Company seeking a suitable site at the basis of trade hit upon the place now occupied by the city of St. Louis, till then without an inhabitant. It was a fortunate selection controlling the trade of a vast region and ere long the place received such accessions of population that from a mere trading station it began to assume the appearance of a town, its entire population of over one thousand souls being almost exclusively engaged in or depending upon the fur trade. From this convenient base the fur trade of the Missouri river was pursued with renewed ardor and increased profit. Step by step the traders with their goods laden barks overcame its powerful current, tribe after tribe was added to the consumers of their merchandise and became contributors of the coveted peltries until at before the close of the last century, they arrived in the territories of...