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Adventures in Iraq and Bosnia Tom Davis

Adventures in Iraq and Bosnia

Tom Davis

Published January 9th 2015
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
35 pages
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 About the Book 

Time frame 1995-1997In this excerpt from the author’s memoir, The Most Fun I Ever Had With My Clothes On: A March from Private to Colonel, COL Davis describes his time as the commander of the Joint Special Operations Task Force Commander in supportMoreTime frame 1995-1997In this excerpt from the author’s memoir, The Most Fun I Ever Had With My Clothes On: A March from Private to Colonel, COL Davis describes his time as the commander of the Joint Special Operations Task Force Commander in support of Operation Provide Comfort II. This combined operation enforced the “No Fly” zone over northern Iraq. This took place between the two Gulf Wars when “no” US forces were in Iraq. None but Special Forces that is. Davis described the operations in Northern Iraq and his visit to a Kurdish village.As the Inspector General of the United States Special Operations Command, Davis was sent into Bosnia to investigate an accidental discharge by a Special Forces soldier which resulted in wounding a US Navy SEAL. Here he recounts his journey through the war torn country, giving his impressions of life in this once pristine land.Excerpts:IRAQ:Our convoy from the CP to the Z-house brought us down “gasoline alley,” a four-lane paved road where the Turks dropped off large red sacks of potatoes and picked up Iraqi diesel fuel for the return trip to Turkey. These “food shipments” of potatoes were allowed under the United Nation (UN) sanctions (food for oil), but guess what? Nobody wanted potatoes, so red bags of potatoes lay stacked and rotting along the highway. The sole purpose for this delivery was to get the vehicles into Iraq under the UN’s humanitarian umbrella. Then the Turks could then fill their trucks with cheap Iraqi fuel that they sold for a huge profit in Turkey. This was no secret as everyone involved with OPC II and those above that level knew what was going on. Typical UN operation.I flew in the lead chopper. It circled to find a landing zone that was flat enough and large enough to accommodate it and the other chopper that accompanied us. On our first landing attempt, the chopper slid backwards as the rear wheel touched down. The pilot immediately lifted off. Our second attempt was no better. Finally, on the third try, we landed, immediately followed by the second bird.We presented quite a show as we disembarked from the choppers. Surrounded by our Peshmurga bodyguards, we moved toward the village. All the children, dressed in colorful clothing, followed us, smiling, waving, and shaking our hands. The villagers seemed and, in fact, were glad to see us.BOSNIA:The carnage created by the warring factions robbed the Bosnians of more than just their homes and land. Rarely did anyone we passed standing beside the road smile at us. The Bosnians seemed totally neutral to NATO’s presence there. A sad quiet veiled their faces, reflecting the years of senseless conflict that had ravaged this once proud and pristine country.We drove along treacherous icy roads in our armed convoy. The lead Land Rover, driven by the most experienced driver–on this day a Navy SEAL–would pass a car then radio back over a hand-held brick radio when it was safe for the trail vehicle, in which I sat, to pass. This system worked quite well. Even so, we rarely exceeded 20 KPH (12 miles per hour) for most of the five-hour, one-way trip. While driving through the mountains, I’d look to my right and down hundreds of feet into the valley below. I remembered the NATO soldiers who died when their automobile slid off the road and down the mountain about this same time of year.