Home » Roman Sites in Jordan: Petra, Roman Towns and Cities in Jordan, Jerash, Tulul Adh-Dhahab, Al Khazneh, Jebel Al-Madhbah, Arthur Flowerdew by Books LLC
Roman Sites in Jordan: Petra, Roman Towns and Cities in Jordan, Jerash, Tulul Adh-Dhahab, Al Khazneh, Jebel Al-Madhbah, Arthur Flowerdew Books LLC

Roman Sites in Jordan: Petra, Roman Towns and Cities in Jordan, Jerash, Tulul Adh-Dhahab, Al Khazneh, Jebel Al-Madhbah, Arthur Flowerdew

Books LLC

Published June 11th 2010
ISBN : 9781157930839
Paperback
48 pages
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Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Petra, Roman Towns and Cities in Jordan, Jerash, TululMorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Petra, Roman Towns and Cities in Jordan, Jerash, Tulul Adh-Dhahab, Al Khazneh, Jebel Al-Madhbah, Arthur Flowerdew, Temple of Artemis, Gadara Aqueduct, Siq, Roman Theater, Raphana, Petra Roman Road. Excerpt: Petra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Pliny the Elder and other writers identify Petra as the capital of the Nabataeans, Aramaic-speaking Semites, and the centre of their caravan trade. Enclosed by towering rocks and watered by a perennial stream, Petra not only possessed the advantages of a fortress, but controlled the main commercial routes which passed through it to Gaza in the west, to Bosra and Damascus in the north, to Aqaba and Leuce Come on the Red Sea, and across the desert to the Persian Gulf. The end of the Siq, with its dramatic view of Al Khazneh (The Treasury)Excavations have demonstrated that it was the ability of the Nabataeans to control the water supply that led to the rise of the desert city, creating an artificial oasis. The area is visited by flash floods and archaeological evidence demonstrates the Nabataeans controlled these floods by the use of dams, cisterns and water conduits. These innovations stored water for prolonged periods of drought, and enabled the city to prosper from its sale. The Theatre The narrow passage (Siq) that leads to Petra Petra is known as the Rose-Red City for the colour of the rocks in which Petra is carvedAlthough in ancient times Petra might have been approached from the south via Saudi Arabia on a track leading around Jabal Haroun (Aarons Mountain), across the plain of Petra, or possibly from the high plateau to the north, most modern visitors approach the site from the east. The impressive eastern entrance leads steeply down through a dark, narrow gorge (in places only 34 m (9.81... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=45008